• Feline Leukemia Virus (FLV)

    Feline leukemia virus (FeLV) is a retrovirus that, like feline immunodeficiency virus (another retrovirus), produces an enzyme known as reverse transcriptase, which allows the retrovirus to inject duplicates of its own genetic matter into the cells it has corrupted. Though closely related, because a

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  • Feline Infectious Peritonitis

    Feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) is a terminal disease that affects cat. Caused by feline infection peritonitis virus (FIPV), it is a mutation of feline enteric coronavirus (FECV) and is more likely to occur in environments where large groups of cats are together, such as animal shelters. The virus

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  • Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV)

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) is a type of virus that weakens a cat’s immune system and makes it difficult for the cat to fight other infections. This virus affects only felines. Spread of FIV Between 1.5 and 3 percent of healthy cats in the United States are infected with FIV. Cats that roam

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  • Feline Diabetes

    Diabetes mellitus is a common disease in which a cat’s body does not make enough insulin or has difficulty using it. This hormone is produced in the pancreas. Its job is to help move glucose from the bloodstream into the body’s cells to provide them with a source of energy. Many cats with diabetes

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  • Feline Anemia

    A diagnosis of anemia means your cat does not have enough red blood cells and/or hemoglobin to carry sufficient oxygen to all of his or her tissues. Each red blood cell lives only 70 to 80 days, so your cat’s body must constantly replenish these. Anemia itself is not a disease; it indicates that some

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  • Eye Problems

    Cats normally have excellent vision—their eyes are about six times more sensitive to light than a human’s eyes. However, injuries and a variety of diseases can impair a cat’s vision and even cause blindness. You can help your cat keep its eyes healthy by making sure it has regular check-ups and

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  • Euthanasia

    It is never easy to say goodbye to a cat that has been part of your life for many years. This is even truer when your veterinarian suggests that you consider euthanasia. However, euthanasia may be the most humane way to care for a beloved best friend that is suffering. Is It Time to Say Good-bye? The

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  • Common Fungal Infections in Cats

    Fungi are spore-generating, parasitic organisms. They are able to survive by taking in food from the hosts on which they grow. Cats can develop fungal infections when fungi spores are ingested, inhaled or enter a cut or wound. Common sources of most fungal infections are soil and bird droppings, making

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  • Cats and Poisons

    Many cat owners already know that insecticides and antifreeze are not things their cats should consume. However, many everyday, innocuous-seeming substances are also poisonous to cats. From a beautiful bouquet of lilies to human medications casually left around the house, you never know what you cat

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  • Anesthesia

    It’s an unfortunate fact that most cats don’t relish a trip to the vet. For this reason, sometimes they need to be sedated—both for their own and the veterinarian’s safety—during even relatively simple procedures. Anything from dental care to a major surgery may require anesthesia. Some especially

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  • Cancer in Cats

    The term “cancer” describes a whole class of diseases. If your cat gets a cancer diagnosis, it means that undesirable cells are growing uncontrollably, invading nearby tissue and possibly spreading through your cat’s body. Some types are more serious than others. As with people, early detection

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  • Sugar Gliders

    Thinking of getting a sugar glider? These tiny marsupials are energetic and friendly, making them popular choices as pets. Though they weigh less than a half-pound, they're more closely related to kangaroos than they are flying squirrels. If you think a sugar glider would make an ideal pet for your family,

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  • Behavioral Issues

    No matter how much you love your cat, some behaviors are hard to tolerate and may even be dangerous to you, your cat or others. Here are a few common cat behavioral issues and how to best manage them. Cognitive Dysfunction Due to better food, information and veterinary care, cats are living longer than

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  • Aging

    Owners often feel sad when they are forced to admit that their beloved cat is no longer jumping as high or running as fast as he or she used to. But cats, like humans, are living longer than ever, and their golden years can be of high quality despite slowing down. Advances in veterinary care, better

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  • Epilepsy

    Epilepsy (often referred to as a seizure disorder) is a chronic neurological condition characterized by recurrent unprovoked seizures. It is commonly controlled with medication, although surgical methods are used as well. Epileptic seizures are classified both by their patterns of activity in the brain

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  • Seasonal Care

    Heat Stroke Heatstroke may kill or seriously injure your pet—but it can easily be avoided by adhering to the following tips. Never leave pets in cars on warm days. Exercise your pet during the cool part of the day. Look out for rapid breathing, loud panting or staggering; these can be signs of dehydration,

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  • Recognizing Illnesses

    Only a healthy pet is a happy companion. Assuring your pet's daily well-being requires regular care and close attention to any hint of ill health. The American Veterinary Medical Association therefore suggests that you consult your veterinarian if your pet shows any of the following signs: * Abnormal

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  • Mealtime

    Puppies Feed a high quality diet designed for puppies. A wide variety of diets and formulations are available and your veterinarian should be your primary source of information as to the best choice for your puppy. The amount fed will vary with the type of food and the individual dog, but in general,

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  • The Decision

    Your decision is a personal one, but it need not be a solitary one. Your veterinarian and your family and friends can assist and support you. How Do I Make The Decision? Your relationship with your pet is special, and you are responsible for its care and welfare. Eventually, many owners are faced with

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  • Camping with Pets

    Camping with pets presents its own challenges. Skunks, raccoons, porcupines, snakes, and other wildlife can bite or otherwise injure your pet. Keep your pet within sight and on a leash. Be considerate of other campers. Be sure to ask your veterinarian about flea, tick and heartworm prevention.

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  • Planning and Preparation

    Planning and preparation are necessary when traveling with family pets. Consider whether your pet is comfortable when traveling. Some animals, like some people, function better in familiar surroundings. A car-sick animal can make a trip miserable for everyone. Some ill or physically impaired dogs and

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  • Travel by Airplane

    Air travel is of most concern to pet owners. You can minimize the chances of an unpleasant experience by following a few guidelines. Federal regulations require that pets be at least 8 weeks old and weaned at least 5 days before flying. Generally, a health certificate (which is not more than 10 days

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  • Travel by Car

    Pets should not be allowed to ride with their heads outside car windows. Particles of dirt can enter the eyes, ears, and nose, causing injury or infection. If your pet is not accustomed to car travel, take it for a few short rides before your trip. Cats should be confined to a cage or crate to allow

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  • First Aid

    Never leave dangerous objects like pins, needles, or fish hooks within reach. Keep poisonous products and materials far from your pet's reach as you would with a child. Of course, before an emergency ever arises, it's a good idea to learn all you can about first aid techniques and pet health care. Never

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  • Grooming

    Cats Felines do a good job of grooming themselves, but regular brushing to prevent matting of hair is important. Cats rarely need a bath, but one can be given if necessary. Cats object to bathing in slippery tubs, so give your kitten something to cling to, such as a wood platform or a wire screen. Use

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  • Exams and Vaccinations

    Experts agree that widespread use of vaccines within the last century has prevented death and disease in millions of animals. Pets, like people, can be protected from some diseases by vaccination. Although this resource provides basic information about vaccinations for your dog or cat, your veterinarian

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  • Obedience and Training

    Obedience training helps prevent negative encounters between family members and the dog. It reinforces the bond between the handler(s) and pet. Obedience Training A MUST for every good family dog, regardless of size or breed! Puppies may start classes when they are as young as 8 weeks old. Obedience

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  • Travel by Bus or Train

    Most states prohibit animals from riding on buses and similar regulations restrict travel on trains. Exceptions are made for guide and service dogs accompanying blind and disabled persons. Consult your local carriers in advance for information.

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  • Cockatiels

    Cockatiels are among the most popular pet birds. Small parrots with a variety of color patterns and a crest, they are attractive as well as friendly and easy to tame. Because of their small size, cockatiel care and taming is easier than some other parrot species. They are capable of mimicking speech,

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  • Zebra Finches

    In general, finches have an expected lifespan of anywhere from 5-15 years. The wide range here can probably be attributed to species differences as well as an increased understanding of their husbandry, especially diet. Zebra finches are arguably the most popular bird species found in the North American

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  • Leopard Geckos

    The scientific name for leopard gekos is Eublepharis Macularius. They may live 20 or more years and grow to be approximately 8-10 inches long. Their common coloring is yellow and white with black spots (hatchlings start out striped, and gradually change to the spotted appearance). There are several color

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  • Green Anoles

    Species: Anolis carolinensis. Sometimes also called American chameleons, although they are not true chameleons. They can do a color change from green to brown, especially when stressed. Quite readily available in the pet trade. Life span averages around 4 years, although they can live longer

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  • Handling and Restraint

    Improper handling may cause serious, life-threatening injuries. Fractures and dislocations of the back, most often resulting in paralysis of both rear legs, are the most common injuries. These injuries occur when rabbits are suddenly frightened and attempt to escape from a small enclosure. A rabbit's

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  • Ferret Health

    You will need to take your ferret in to your veterinarian twice a year for a medical checkup and yearly vaccinations. Ferrets require yearly inoculations against canine distemper. They are highly susceptible to canine distemper and it is always fatal. Do not forget to inoculate against this every year!

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  • Food and Housing

    Food Feeding pet rabbits is easy because nutritionally complete and balanced commercial pelleted diets are readily available. One of these pelleted diets and fresh water are all a pet rabbit requires. The pellets should be offered at all times unless overeating and obesity have become problems. The pellets

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